These are the watches worn by the most powerful CEOs in the world

For some businessmen, a wristwatch is more than a time-telling device. It’s a statement.

“A watch is the greatest icebreaker there is,” says Hamilton Powell, the CEO of Crown & Caliber, an online secondary market for luxury watches.

“In an unfamiliar city, I can approach a complete stranger and with two words eradicate any barriers,” he tells Business Insider. “Nice watch.”

“A watch tells people about the type of person you are and what you value,” Powell adds. “The guy who wears a blinged-out gold-diamond Hublot is very different than the guy with a vintage stainless-steel Zenith chronograph.”

With the help of Crown & Caliber, we’ve put together a list and commentary about the wristwatches worn by 11 CEOs of some of the world’s most powerful companies.

 

Doug McMillon, president and CEO of Walmart

Doug McMillon, president and CEO of Walmart

At 50 years old, Doug McMillon is the youngest CEO on this list. He has been the president and CEO of Walmart since February 2014. Before serving in this capacity, McMillon was the president and CEO of Walmart International, “a fast-growing segment of Walmart’s overall operations.”

According to his company profile, Walmart is visited each week by nearly 260 million customers in 11,529 stores and online. Walmart is the world’s largest employer with over 2.3 million associates. In 2016 its revenues totaled $481.1 billion.

Citizen Skyhawk A-T JY0000-53E — $479

Citizen Skyhawk A-T JY0000-53E — $479

McMillon wears a Citizen Skyhawk in the previous slide. And, not surprisingly, the watch, which retails for $479.

Jeffrey Immelt, CEO of General Electric

Jeffrey Immelt, CEO of General Electric

Jeffrey Immelt has been the CEO of the industrial giant General Electric for more than 16 years. He has been frequently recognized for his success as a CEO. His company profile says he’s been named one of the “World’s Best CEOs” three times by Barron’s, and since he began serving as CEO, GE has been named “America’s most Admired Company” in a poll conducted by Fortune.

With a market cap of over $250 billion, General Electric is one of the largest public firms in the world. In 2016 its revenues totalled $123.7 billion

Breitling Chronospace M78365 — $6,650.00

Breitling Chronospace M78365 — $6,650.00

wroclaw.plan.pl

The experts at Crown & Caliber identified Immelt’s watch as a Breitling Chronospace. A similar model can be purchased pre-owned on its website for $3,780. The watch retails for $6,650.00.

Mark Fields, president and CEO of Ford

Mark Fields, president and CEO of Ford

Motor Trend

Mark Fields has been the president and CEO of Ford Motor Co. since July 2014. According to his company profile, since Fields assumed his role he has pushed the company into “emerging opportunities” such as autonomous cars, data, and analytics.

Ford is one of the largest automakers. The Ford F-150 is the most popular vehicle in the US.

Jaeger LeCoultre Master Reserve de Marche Q1488104 — $9,350

Jaeger LeCoultre Master Reserve de Marche Q1488104 — $9,350

Crown & Caliber

According to Luxury Bazaar’s website, the watch Fields is wearing in the previous slide retails for $9,350. But it is not currently available for purchase. A model with a similar face can be purchased on Crown & Caliber’s site for $5,750.

Tim Cook, CEO of Apple

Tim Cook, CEO of Apple

Fortune

With a market cap of over $700 billion, Apple is the world’s most valuable company. And the man at the helm of it all is Tim Cook. He assumed the position as CEO in 2011.

According to CNBC, Cook “has overseen a rise in Apple’s share price of more than 175 percent since being named CEO in August 2011. That’s better than the S&P 500, Nasdaq and Dow over the same time period.”

Apple Watch — $269

Apple Watch — $269

Pricenfees

Cook is rarely seen without his Apple Watch. You can purchase one here on Apple’s website. They retail starting at $269.

Akio Toyoda, president of Toyota

Akio Toyoda, president of Toyota

Akio Toyoda is the president of Toyota Motor Corp., the world’s largest automaker, a post which he has held since 2009. Before that, he was appointed to the board of directors in 2000 and promoted to executive vice president in 2005.

According to his company profile, he received his MBA from Babson College in 1982 and joined Toyota (TMC) in 1984. In its most recent fiscal year, Toyota made 8.7 million vehicles and pulled in $19 billion in net profits, which represents a 6% increase from 2015.

Patek Philippe Calatrava 5119G — $21,500

Patek Philippe Calatrava 5119G — $21,500

Toyoda has been photographed numerous times wearing what the team at Crown & Caliber expect to be a Patek Philippe Calatrava. This watch retails for $21,000, but watch lovers can purchase it pre-owned for $16,860 on C&C’s site.

John Watson, CEO of Chevron

John Watson, CEO of Chevron

John Watson is the CEO and chairman of the board of Chevron Corp., a post he has held since 2010.

He received his MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and joined Chevron in 1980, serving as its CFO from 2001 to 2005 and vice chairman of the board from 2009 to 2010.

Chevron is an energy corporation that produces natural gas and geothermal energy, as well as alternative-energy research and operations such as solar, wind power, and biofuels. And with a market cap of over $200 billion, it is one of the largest publicly traded firms.

Randall Stephenson, CEO of AT&T

Randall Stephenson, CEO of AT&T

Randall Stephenson is the chairman, CEO, and president of AT&T, the multinational telecommunications firm. In addition to its flagship brand, AT&T, the company owns DirectTV, Cricket Wireless, and Roots Sports. With a market cap of over $250 billion, AT&T is one of the largest publicly traded firms.

Stephenson has been the firm’s CEO since 2007. Last year he was named CEO of the Year by Chief Executive magazine.

TAG Heuer Kirium CL111A — $415

TAG Heuer Kirium CL111A — $415

A pre-owned version of the watch Stephenson is sporting in the previous slide is going for $415 on Amazon.

Michael Corbat, CEO of Citigroup

Michael Corbat, CEO of Citigroup

Michael Corbat is CEO of Citigroup, one of the world’s largest banks, a post he has held since 2012. Corbat has been at Citi since he graduated from Harvard University with a degree in economics in 1983, as CEO of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, overseeing all business operations, head of Citi’s Global Corporate Bank and Global Commercial Bank, and before that CEO of Citi Holdings.

Jaeger LeCoultre Master Perpetual Calendar Q149242A — $11,500

Jaeger LeCoultre Master Perpetual Calendar Q149242A — $11,500

Crown & Caliber

In the previous slide, Corbat was photographed wearing a Jaeger LeCoultre Master Perpetual Calendar. The watch goes for $11,500 pre-owned on Crown & Caliber’s site.

John Hammergren, CEO of McKesson

John Hammergren, CEO of McKesson

HIT Consultant

John Hammergren is chairman, president, and CEO of McKesson Corp. He was elected president and CEO in 2001 and chairman in 2002. Before joining McKesson in 1996, he worked for Kendall Healthcare Products, which was later sold to Tyco Healthcare. McKesson is a leading provider of healthcare services, distributing pharmaceuticals, and providing information-technology solutions to improve healthcare.

According to his company profile on McKesson’s website, the company has more than quadrupled its revenue to $190 billion since Hammergren became CEO.

Rolex Submariner 116610 — $8,360

Rolex Submariner 116610 — $8,360

Hammergren’s watch is going for $8,360 pre-owned on Crown & Caliber’s website. If you want it, then you better act fast as there is one left in stock.

 

Dieter Zetsche, chairman of Daimler

Dieter Zetsche, chairman of Daimler

Dieter Zetsche has been chairman of the board of directors of Daimler AG, the multinational automotive corporation, and head of Mercedes-Benz cars, since 2006.

He was named in Time magazine’s list of 100 most influential people in 2006. He holds a doctorate in engineering from the University of Paderborn.

Chopard Mille Miglia GMT Chronograph 16/8992-3001 — $6,140

Chopard Mille Miglia GMT Chronograph 16/8992-3001 — $6,140

Zetsche’s watch retails for $6,140 but can be purchased on PrestigeTime.com for $4,420.

A similar model can be purchased pre-owned on Crown & Caliber for $2,940.

Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon

Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon

Forbes

Jeff Bezos is the founder, chairman, and CEO of Amazon.com. Bezos ranks as the fifth-richest person in the world with an estimated net worth of $71.8 billion in January 2017, according to Forbes. In 2013, Bezos purchased The Washington Post for $250 million.

Amazon’s stock has been climbing because of the proliferation of Amazon Web Services, Amazon’s cloud-computing service. Its market cap stands at over $400 billion.

Ulysse Nardin Dual Time 233-88-7 — $7,700

Ulysse Nardin Dual Time 233-88-7 — $7,700

Crown & Caliber

Bezos has been photographed frequently wearing at Ulysse Nardin Dual Time. It retails for $7,700 new but can be purchased pre-owned on Crown & Caliber for $4,150.

Black Friday is the busiest day of the year for plumbers — but not for the reason you think

  • Black Friday is the busiest day of the year for plumbers, who receive up to 50% more calls than they do on a normal Friday.
  • Clogged sinks are the most common problem, since people try to improperly dispose of food scraps.

Plumbers like buying discount TVs as much as anyone, but don’t expect them to join you in much Black Friday shopping.

For plumbers, the day after Thanksgiving is “Brown Friday.”

Roto-Rooter, the largest supplier of plumbing, sewer, and drain services, says Black Friday is busiest day of the year for plumbers. Calls for services increase by up to 50% compared to a normal Friday, and up to 27% over a regular Friday-to-Sunday period.

But don’t blame the human waste that follows a hearty Thanksgiving meal.

“It’s not even close,” Paul Abrams, director of public relations for Roto-Rooter, told ABC. “The number one reason for calls is kitchen sink drains and garbage disposals.”

When in the throes of cooking a Thanksgiving feast, it may seem okay to wash wads of potato skins, bits of turkey, or oily drippings down the drain. But Roto-Rooter advises people to throw all solids and oils away, and never to use the toilet to dispose of scraps that don’t fit down the sink.

“This time of year, homes have extra occupants in the form of holiday guests who are taking extra showers and flushing more toilets,” Abrams said in a statement. “That alone puts additional stress on many residential drain systems.”

Adding in other bulky objects only raises the chance that your Black Friday will turn brown.

Facebook rolls out AI to detect suicidal posts before they’re reported

This is software to save lives. Facebook’s new “proactive detection” artificial intelligence technology will scan all posts for patterns of suicidal thoughts, and when necessary send mental health resources to the user at risk or their friends, or contact local first-responders. By using AI to flag worrisome posts to human moderators instead of waiting for user reports, Facebook can decrease how long it takes to send help.

Facebook previously tested using AI to detect troubling posts and more prominently surface suicide reporting options to friends in the U.S. Now Facebook is will scour all types of content around the world with this AI, except in the European Union, where General Data Protection Regulation privacy laws on profiling users based on sensitive information complicate the use of this tech.

Facebook also will use AI to prioritize particularly risky or urgent user reports so they’re more quickly addressed by moderators, and tools to instantly surface local language resources and first-responder contact info. It’s also dedicating more moderators to suicide prevention, training them to deal with the cases 24/7, and now has 80 local partners like Save.org, National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and Forefront from which to provide resources to at-risk users and their networks.

“This is about shaving off minutes at every single step of the process, especially in Facebook Live,” says VP of product management Guy Rosen. Over the past month of testing, Facebook has initiated more than 100 “wellness checks” with first-responders visiting affected users. “There have been cases where the first-responder has arrived and the person is still broadcasting.”

The idea of Facebook proactively scanning the content of people’s posts could trigger some dystopian fears about how else the technology could be applied. Facebook didn’t have answers about how it would avoid scanning for political dissent or petty crime, with Rosen merely saying “we have an opportunity to help here so we’re going to invest in that.” There are certainly massive beneficial aspects about the technology, but it’s another space where we have little choice but to hope Facebook doesn’t go too far.

[Update: Facebook’s chief security officer Alex Stamos responded to these concerns with a heartening tweet signaling that Facebook does take seriously responsible use of AI.

The creepy/scary/malicious use of AI will be a risk forever, which is why it’s important to set good norms today around weighing data use versus utility and be thoughtful about bias creeping in. Also, Guy Rosen and team are amazing, great opportunity for ML engs to have impact.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg praised the product update in a post today, writing that “In the future, AI will be able to understand more of the subtle nuances of language, and will be able to identify different issues beyond suicide as well, including quickly spotting more kinds of bullying and hate.”

Unfortunately, after TechCrunch asked if there was a way for users to opt out, of having their posts a Facebook spokesperson responded that users cannot opt out. They noted that the feature is designed to enhance user safety, and that support resources offered by Facebook can be quickly dismissed if a user doesn’t want to see them.]

Facebook trained the AI by finding patterns in the words and imagery used in posts that have been manually reported for suicide risk in the past. It also looks for comments like “are you OK?” and “Do you need help?”

“We’ve talked to mental health experts, and one of the best ways to help prevent suicide is for people in need to hear from friends or family that care about them,” Rosen says. “This puts Facebook in a really unique position. We can help connect people who are in distress connect to friends and to organizations that can help them.”

How suicide reporting works on Facebook now

Through the combination of AI, human moderators and crowdsourced reports, Facebook could try to prevent tragedies like when a father killed himself on Facebook Live last month. Live broadcasts in particular have the power to wrongly glorify suicide, hence the necessary new precautions, and also to affect a large audience, as everyone sees the content simultaneously unlike recorded Facebook videos that can be flagged and brought down before they’re viewed by many people.

Now, if someone is expressing thoughts of suicide in any type of Facebook post, Facebook’s AI will both proactively detect it and flag it to prevention-trained human moderators, and make reporting options for viewers more accessible.

When a report comes in, Facebook’s tech can highlight the part of the post or video that matches suicide-risk patterns or that’s receiving concerned comments. That avoids moderators having to skim through a whole video themselves. AI prioritizes users reports as more urgent than other types of content-policy violations, like depicting violence or nudity. Facebook says that these accelerated reports get escalated to local authorities twice as fast as unaccelerated reports.

Mark Zuckerberg gets teary-eyed discussing inequality during his Harvard commencement speech in May

Facebook’s tools then bring up local language resources from its partners, including telephone hotlines for suicide prevention and nearby authorities. The moderator can then contact the responders and try to send them to the at-risk user’s location, surface the mental health resources to the at-risk user themselves or send them to friends who can talk to the user. “One of our goals is to ensure that our team can respond worldwide in any language we support,” says Rosen.

Back in February, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote that “There have been terribly tragic events — like suicides, some live streamed — that perhaps could have been prevented if someone had realized what was happening and reported them sooner . . .  Artificial intelligence can help provide a better approach.”

With more than 2 billion users, it’s good to see Facebook stepping up here. Not only has Facebook created a way for users to get in touch with and care for each other. It’s also unfortunately created an unmediated real-time distribution channel in Facebook Live that can appeal to people who want an audience for violence they inflict on themselves or others.

Creating a ubiquitous global communication utility comes with responsibilities beyond those of most tech companies, which Facebook seems to be coming to terms with.

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